Kind of sawdust to use in the North West

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Composting Around the World: Kind of sawdust to use in the North West
Author: Test2 (Test2)
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 8:44 pm
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Found this post - ands sounds like your situation:

"Author: Ken Warren
Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 3:18 am
My compost doesn't seem to be heating up. I have been using my sawdust toilet for a couple of months now and when I checked the temperature this morning the pile was 90F when the ambient temperature was 60F. I am thinking that it may be because I am using Doug fir sawdust as it is the only thing readily available. There is an old mill where there are old piles of sawdust but they probably contains pine, fir, and cedar. Has any one out there tried using Doug fir?
My commpost bin is about 4'x4'x4'and I am using weeds, dry grass, straw and hay as cover material
I spray it with water every few days and I emptyl the blucket after wrensing on to the pile. Should I try adding some fresh horse manure. There are also older manure piles (horse) if that would be better"

Author: Ken Warren
Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 3:18 am
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My compost doesn't seem to be heating up. I have been using my sawdust toilet for a couple of months now and when I checked the temperature this morning the pile was 90F when the ambient temperature was 60F. I am thinking that it may be because I am using Doug fir sawdust as it is the only thing readily available. There is an old mill where there are old piles of sawdust but they probably contains pine, fir, and cedar. Has any one out there tried using Doug fir?
My commpost bin is about 4'x4'x4'and I am using weeds, dry grass, straw and hay as cover material
I spray it with water every few days and I emptyl the blucket after wrensing on to the pile. Should I try adding some fresh horse manure. There are also older manure piles (horse) if that would be better.

Author: Joe Jenkins
Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 9:03 pm
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How dry is it where you are? Compost likes to be damp clear through. Maybe try adding more liquid. Are you adding all your urine?

Author: Ron Mazerolle
Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 5:21 pm
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I've had the same problem. I've used my toilet for over 3 months and no heating going on. I used mixed sawdust aged over the winter. I see Joe uses chicken poop in his bin. This is a hot manure and I suspect that this is the reason that Joe's compost heats up so quick. I add all kicthen wastes and still it dosen't heat up. Sawdust and straw ( which I use as a cover material has a very high carbon ratio and needs a lot of nitrogen to offset this.( idealy 30 parts carbon to 1 part nitrogen) I don't think the urine and humanure provide enough nitrogen. I have another compost pile that I use for leaves - grass and yard wastes. I get finished compost from this pile 4 or 5 times a year. Thats why I keep it seperate from my humanure pile. Today I combined piles and I will be guarenteed to have a hot pile. The only thing is, I won't get that one year interval that I was hoping to get unless I forego using my compost several times a year.

Author: Joe Jenkins
Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 9:03 am
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Chicken manure is added to my compost only when we clean out the chicken coop, which is not very often, and usually I use the chicken manure as a mulch - uncomposted. Our compost heats up without the chicken manure. We do not segregate any material from the humanure compost, however. All yard materials, weeds from the garden, etc., go into the humanure compost. Green materials such as grass clippings (which we usually use for mulch but occasionally put into the compost) are excellent for humanure compost piles.

Author: Ron Mazerolle
Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 5:59 pm
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As I suspected my compost is very hot today. I didn't measure the temperature but the steel rod I inserted for 10 minutes became almost too hot to handle. I think I'll use compost or partially finished compost for a cover material from now on and possibly peat moss through the winter. Sawdust and straw will only be used in limited quanaties perhaps mixed with peat moss. Sun-Mar suggests a mixture of peat moss & hemp stock(or wood chips) for their compost toilets and it works quite well.

Author: saths
Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 2:48 pm
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Mr Jenkins,
Do you use sawdust in your chicken coup?

Author: Joe Jenkins
Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 10:22 pm
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We do not use sawdust in our chicken coop - only hay.

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