Squash vine boarers...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Composting Around the World: Squash vine boarers...
Author: Palmtreepathos (Palmtreepathos)
Tuesday, July 17, 2007 - 11:16 am
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This year is the first for actually using the humanure compost in my veggie garden. First off my neighbor who was our resident master gardener is sooo jealous. I went from having a not so pretty or productive plot to having one that looks like the garden of eden, 8-)

On the lines of this thread I have for the first time ever had Zucchini plants robust enough to ward off the vine borer. It may be how I planted them though. A 4x10 foot bed, the backside has 27 corn plants inter-planted with pole beans and the zukes planted at the front foot and a half of the corn bed and in between them I planted nasturstiums and radishes. the fragrance of the flowers may be the secret(the radishes totally shaded out). I also grew that bed on virgin soil that had been under a tree that we removed over the winter to expand the garden. My zucchini vines have crossed the 2 ft wide path in front of this bed and are now about 2 ft up a small fence(about 5 ft in length) and still growing. You don't dare turn your back on these things or the zukes look like watermelons!

I too believe in the compost EVERYTHING process but I sequester the rampant weeds and buggy things in a bucket just covered with water til they ferment then I it add to the pile. I believe this fermenting process renders seeds sterile and the bacteria on the roots and bits of soil that I leave on the plants do their part in digesting the offending critters. IMHO
BTW this will be a stinky bucket so you may want to cover it, also it will attract bugs. It makes fresh humanure buckets smell like flowers by comparison. I use it in layer gardening too(fermented weeds under 4 inches of soil and then planted over) and those beds have the most worms by comparison to any in my garden.

Author: Shelly Skye (Shelly)
Wednesday, October 18, 2006 - 1:52 pm
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I once read that if you put the diseased plant material in a black plastic bag and set it in the sun for a while (a week or so?) that the heat inside will definately kill any remaining undesirable critters. I would think you could then put the super heat-treated vines in your compost pile with complete confidence of it being safe. I haven't done it myself but it seems like a failsafe plan. Good luck!

Author: heather moser (Stellaria)
Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 9:46 am
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We lost our zukes to an immigrant population of squash vine boarers this year (never again- no matter how desperate I am will i buy a single plant start from a commercial place. uuugh)
so i pilled all the vines (they were that far gone) and am now debating whether or not they'd be safe for the humaure pile. My pile regualrly hits 120-130F. Anyone have any experience to share? Will that destroy any remaining eggs? The alternative is burning them, but they got mixed with some other compostables by accident and I am trying to avoid the seperation shuffle.
thanks!

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