INDIA

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Composting Around the World: INDIA
Author: Joe (Joe)
Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 1:47 pm
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How No-Flush Toilets Can Help Make a Healthier World

11 Oct 2012: Report

Inadequate sewage systems and the lack of toilets in much of the developing world have created a major public health and environmental crisis. Now various innovators are promoting new kinds of toilets and technologies that use little or no water and recycle the waste.

by Cheryl Colopy

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Monday, November 23, 2009 - 9:50 pm
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Joe, 18 Dec last year, you posted info regarding efforts to get Humanure techniques accepted in India (Mahanrashtra). Have you had any more communication with them to date? In the not-too-distant future I am hoping to travel that part of the world, and would like to be in contact with the people involved if possible. Their farming methods in particular sound most interesting. Contact details would be helpful, or you could ask them if they wish to communicated directly with me.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Monday, May 04, 2009 - 12:24 pm
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You have good questions, but I don't know the answers. Clearly, when water is used instead of toilet paper, more absorbent cover material would be required. How it would affect the compost - I don't know, but my guess is that it could still be composted with the necessary increase of cover material. Some experimentation is needed. If you do any, let me know.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Monday, May 04, 2009 - 12:24 pm
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From email:

I read your book on humanure and was fascinated. But I have one small doubt.

In India we don't use toilet papers but we use water to clean the anus portion and in this process we tend to use a lot of water.

Will this affect the efficiency of the waste receptacle / compost as I fear the mass would become wet instead of being moist ? As a lot of water would deter the thermophilic action , how one can increase the efficiency of thermophilic activity ?

Author: Joe Jenkins (Joe)
Thursday, December 18, 2008 - 11:12 am
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Sent to me via email:

I have already built the hacienda on my 6 acres farm in India. The farm is used to introduce Rishi-Krishi method of organic farming to farmers, in the state of Mahanrashtra in India. Rishi-Krishi is based on Vedic methodology of agriculture. I believe the humanure fits very well in our very simplistic method of farming.
My biggest challenge is the Cultural constraints.
I have the toilet built with instructions in Marathi language. But nobody wants to use it because of the cultural mindset. You have done a wonderful job on creating the instructional clips on your website [http://jenkinspublishing.com/videos.html]. I'm going to copy it to DVD and show it to the group in India. If you have anymore ideas on solving this, I would appreciate receiving a email from you.

My response:

The idea of collecting and composting human manure is one that is viewed with various emotions by people of any culture, not just Indian. Even in the U.S., there are many people who consider the idea disgusting. However, those who educate themselves about the issue and understand the proper way to recycle toilet material, which can be done using pleasant, odor-free, fly-free toilets and using odor-free compost systems, have a different attitude. You need to find people who have that knowledge and understanding to help you with the toilet system at your farm. People can use the toilets, regardless of their attitude, then the toilet material can be collected and recycled by the more knowledgeable and understanding people. I have always called the humanure toilet the "thinking person's toilet." Not everyone in India is closed-minded on this issue, I'm sure.

Author: Joe Jenkins (Joe)
Thursday, February 14, 2008 - 8:56 pm
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This came via email from India:

Dear Friends,
We are happy to share with you one more of our successful experiments here on our campus.
Our compost toilet is now up and running. Though only a couple of us are using it so far, it works so well that soon we hope more people will make the switch and stop flushing their waste with drinking water...
Some pictures of the toilet are attached with this mail.
The basic framework of the toilet is a simple
3-ft.sq. structure made of iron slotted angles put together with nuts and bolts. The walls are made of thick cardboard sections.
This structure was built by us along with the INSPIRE group last summer (see http://www.summerinindia.org ), and has since then successfully weathered a monsoon and also several storms.
The 'seat' is made of wooden planks of pinewood, held together by pegs (no nails/screws!) made of deodar wood.
The bucket that can be seen in the picture contains sawdust, which is used as a cover material after every use. The sawdust also provides the C (carbon) component, to balance the N (nitrogen) component from the humanure, resulting in excellent compost.
Right now people have to carry in their own supply of water for personal cleansing, but soon we'll be putting in another bucket-and-mug to contain water for cleansing.
The sawdust is a very efficient bio-filter as well, and there is absolutely no malodour even right inside the toilet!
This isn't just a toilet. It is also what we call an art 'uninstallation', that we have chosen to call Loominosity. Outside, there are 1-ft.sq sections on the toilet, on which the users of the toilet are invited to express themselves artistically with wax crayons; the attempts of the users so far can be seen in the last picture. (The drawings, from top to bottom, are by Karuna, Vinish, and Chaiti).

In case you are interested further in the workings of a thermophilic compost toilet like this one, or why anyone should even bother about the issue, read the priceless book, Humanure Handbook, available online at:

http://weblife.org/humanure/default.html
To buy the printed version of the book in India, a price just over Rs.800 (well worth it!):
http://www.a1books.co.in/searchresult.do?keyword=humanure+handbook&imageField=Go


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Author: TCLynx (Tclynx)
Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 8:43 pm
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Sad since the composting provides much healthier soil for growing plants than using a fertilizer like urine alone.

Author: Ralf Ketzer (Ralf_ct)
Thursday, October 25, 2007 - 3:08 am
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I've tried getting in touch with him many times via his website, without success. There are many composting toilet suppliers around the world eager to get a slice of the lucrative pie. Mr. Pathak alone will be unable to provide sanitation solutions to 730 million people.

Author: Joe Jenkins (Joe)
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 12:00 pm
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Human waste can help save planet: Indian expert

Oct 16 10:11 AM US/Eastern

A cheap system to recycle human waste into biogas and fertiliser may allow 2.6 billion people in the world access to toilets and reduce global warming, an Indian environmental expert said Tuesday.
Bindeshwar Pathak, founder of the Sulabh International Social Service Organisation, said his group plans to push the system at the seventh annual World Toilet Summit, to be held in New Delhi at the end of October.

The organisation is dedicated to providing toilets to nearly 730 million people in India who lack them.

"The Millennium Development Goals set in South Africa in 2002 aim by 2015 to cut by half the 2.6 billion people worldwide who lack toilets and provide them to all by 2025," Pathak said at a briefing ahead of the summit.

He said India's contribution would be a toilet system that organically breaks down faeces into trapped biogas that can be burned to provide cooking fuel and electricity, and convert urine into fertiliser.

"Now we want others to know about this technology which was recently installed at Kabul, Afghanistan, because it can help meet the Millennium Development Goals and reduce global warming."

Founded in 2001 as a non-profit organisation, the World Toilet Organisation aims to make sanitation a key global issue and now says it has 55 member groups from 42 countries.

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