Earth worms

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Earth worms
Author: TCLynx (Tclynx)
Friday, February 01, 2008 - 8:09 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Denis,
With some people it just takes time with an idea before they become comfortable with it.

Otherwise, maybe you just need to subtract every flush from the flushers' shower allotment? Then they might be keen to not use the water toilet?

Good luck

Author: Denis Gauthier (Fecophile)
Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - 6:22 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

John, thank you!

For some reason it had not clicked with me, but you are right that the graywater goes through the biolytix and I need to deal with that anyway...and the water is being used regardless so there is no waste.

It _is_ ideal, isn't it?

Coool.

Now the only difficulty will be convincing anyone else in my family to use the humanure toilet (to save on water...we have it down to 100 litres/day for a family of 5 at the moment and that appeals to my ascetic, go-easy-on-the-earth / live-sustainably nature)

Cheers,

Denis

Author: Tassiejohn (Tassiejohn)
Wednesday, January 23, 2008 - 5:44 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Denis,

I don't have a Biolitix, but they look like a great idea (ethics of flushing toilets aside). My understanding is that they are also sold as graywater treament systems, I'm assuming you'll still be discharging your grey water to it so it should continue to work just fine.
I remember reading something from the Biolitix people saying they were fine for shack / weekenders, so they must be able to survive a reasonable time without input too.
To me it sounds ideal, a system which treats your greywater for reuse with very minimal power & maintenance requirements, fulfils council requirements, plus gives you a flushing toilet for fecophobe guests and those last minute craps when your heading out the door for a couple of week holiday or the like!

Author: Denis Gauthier (Fecophile)
Wednesday, January 23, 2008 - 12:05 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Hi all,

I am building a house on a block of land and council requires me to use an approved system. The one I am looking at uses worms and other living organisms.

http://www.biolytix.com/index.php

I am wondering if anyone has experience with something like this and could compare and contrast the biolytix product with humanure composting. The main drawback I see is that it is setup for a normal toilet system which requires me to use a lot of water wastefully (and in Queensland Australia, that is a problem - all my water is collected from my rooftop.).

If I install this system and then continue using my humanure toilet, the biolytix organisms will die and I do not know how long the worm eggs will survive. Apparently they can last 1 year anyway, and then revive when the toilet is used again, but more than that? Anyone know?

I am grateful for any input.

thanks,

Denis

Author: Esse Hopper
Friday, February 20, 2004 - 8:00 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Just wondering how earth worms fit in with the thermophilic composting, if at all. Does anyone know if they kill pathogens when digesting their "food"?

Author: Steve Adamczyk
Friday, February 20, 2004 - 10:30 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

When the thermos are active the compost is much too hot for worms and they head south until it cools. It's all in "Humanure."

Author: Carole Bond
Wednesday, March 24, 2004 - 1:58 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

A few of us were outside this noon and we happen to see the most interesting worm we have ever seen. None of us had ever seen this type of worm before. It was very long, approx. 12" and no bigger around than a heavy string. As we watched it, it appreared to tie itself in knots. We live in NW Wisconsin and the temperature is approx. 60 degrees today.

Can anyone help identify what type of worm this might be??

Author: Callie
Friday, April 02, 2004 - 1:40 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Anyone interested in worms should check out the Worm Digest.

www.wormdigest.org

and there's a list of links at The Worm Farm: Vermiculture Resources

http://www.empnet.com/worms/resource.htm

The issue of pathogen reduction has been addressed, including an EPA funded pilot, and the news is that yes, worms do eat pathogenic bacteria as well as non.

Author: Stephen
Sunday, April 04, 2004 - 2:01 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Under the "Humanure Composting Around The World" thread, there is a topic of Worms in case you folk were unaware.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
http://www.discusware.com