"Luggable loo"

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: "Luggable loo"
Author: MJ Raichyk (Cighe)
Wednesday, December 10, 2008 - 7:21 pm
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We got our composting toilet substitute at Walmart for about $25. I wanted something that was comfortable and wasn't as heavy to haul to the bin and heft over the top of the bin wall. These Walmart models are called Reliance Hassocks, have a 4 gal bucket and a molded seat as well as a sealing lid for travel to worksites on the truck. We don't usually keep the lid down tight and there shouldn't be an odor problem anyway as long as you have been covering each use with an adequate supply of paper -- shredded, dismembered junkmail, cardboard packaging and paper towels for cleaning, tissues and even our kitchen offal goes in. The hassock has a sort of 'give' like a cushion and I like the lowness. All of us are under 5'10" and 160 pounds so I can't say what a really big person might feel.

We separate urine frequently, just as Roxy does, but we also read that the Finns were using urine as a replacement fertilizer instead of the petroleum-based stuff quite successfully, both in terms of plant growth and in terms of clean produce (fewer microbes at harvest time). Check Science News about a year ago. Used very dilutedly, we had a large crop of tomatoes and peppers in our container garden.

Sorry to hear you got stuck with one of those expensive mounds, Mr Y. We're using a wetlands for our greywater since that's all that's left after we compost the hassock's contents. Probably only cost 5% of the mound and now we're gearing up to see if we can get this sort of combination through the state approval. Cross your fingers, I'm still reading the proposal requirements and gathering research support. Anyone who's ever tried it doesn't seem to be announcing their success or their difficulties. Anyone ever heard such a story?

Author: Roxy Martin (Cherokeerox)
Monday, December 08, 2008 - 7:29 am
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I live on a small piece of land in a tiny (288 sq ft)cabin with no running water or septic system.
I have used the Luggable Loo for the 8 months that I have lived here. I picked up the lid at a Bass Pro shop for $10.
I have experimented with different methods and here's what I have found works best for me.
I have 2 buckets, one for urine only, one for solid matter. I live alone, so the solid bucket only needs to be emptied about once a month if you don't urinate in it. I use peat moss for cover material and one bag lasts six months. I also have absolutely no odor by separating urine from fecal matter.(This learned through trial and error)
The urine bucket has to emptied once a week, and I have a separate bin filled with leaves to empty it into. The urine breaks down the leaves pretty quickly, then they can be added to my humanure bin.
In the 8 months since I started composting, my bin is only half full. Its a 4x4 round chicken wire bin. Emptying the Loo is also much easier when its not filled with urine that splashes everywhere.
I use mostly leaves for cover material as my land is literally covered with large trees.
I am ready to start a new bin and let the first one rest a few more months, so I got free pallets and plan on making one like Mr. Jenkins.
My question is how long should I keep filling the original bin before I start a new one? My first one is only half full, but the bottom looks to be fully composted, so I hesitate to add anything new to it.
Also, should I turn my old heap and bring the compost to the top and the newer additions to the bottom?

Author: catbox (Catbox)
Friday, February 09, 2007 - 5:23 pm
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I have a large body and I find my Luggable Loo very comfortable. I unhooked the lid for fear of breaking the hinge with my bulky body. I put a newspaper section on top of the seat, then I lay the lid on top of the newspaper. This absorbs the condensation and also makes an odor barrier. My house is too small for a wooden box.
I think everyone should have a Luggable Loo and a supply of cover material on hand for emergecies.

Author: John D. Younkin (Deconstructer)
Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 5:12 pm
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We purchased a Luggable Loo and have been using it while we were living in out 24' camper and building our house. The law pretty much required my to spend over $10k on a giagantic sand mound before they would grant the permit so that I could live in my own house. Bummer. We are still using the Luggable Loo today. It has deveploped a small crack on the seat though. It has a nasty tendency to condinsate on the bottom of the lid then flop into you back while you are on it. The cold water is very surprising. And one more thing, the round seat takes some getting use to. It has a different feel then the classic toilet seat. I am happy with the results though. I can say that it did in a pinch after the complete faulure of our 1973 camper toilet. The Luggable Loo is still working today.

Author: Derek
Saturday, October 29, 2005 - 6:18 pm
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Anyone try these?
Luggable loo:
http://www.cabelas.com/products/Cpod0009518.jsp

I love the two I picked up. They fit directly on a 5gal bucket, no need for a box or seperate toilet seat. Best of all, they fit tightly around the bucket, and the lid snaps down and keeps the bucket nearly sealed. Far less odor can escape.

Author: Anonymous
Sunday, October 30, 2005 - 12:57 am
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I have one out in my shop, and have one in my "RV" (a 1964 Alaskan Camper mounted on an old pickup bed trailer)
I agree, they work really well!

Author: Wayne
Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 12:57 pm
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Looks like they're very functional--and rather inexpensive, too! But it's nice (on the home-made models) to be able to lift up the lid for number one... Also, because of the (perceived) excentricity of those of us engaged in this enterprise, I felt it important to make my toilet as attractive as my woodworking ability would allow. For 2 or 3 weeks, I would causually mention to a lady friend about my "little woodworking project"... Finally, when her curiosity got the best of her and she pressed me to know what it was, I gave her chapter 8 from the online handbook to read. I wasn't at all sure how she would react, but as it turned out, she was very enthusiastic and wanted to help build the compost bins. To this day (a few months later), she is the only one who seems to understand my enthusiasm for the project.

--
Wayne Ferguson
wayneferguson@juno.com
http://www.TheFourPrecepts.com/waynesworld/humanure.html

Author: admin
Friday, November 04, 2005 - 10:54 am
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Thanks for the link. I put links to the luggable loo on this website. I bought one to have a look at it and it seems like a convenient way to have a quick bucket toilet, especially for camping, etc.

Joe Jenkins

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