Seeds in compost pile

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Seeds in compost pile
Author: TCLynx (Tclynx)
Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 8:28 pm
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The trick is to make sure the weed seeds wind up in the hottest part of the compost pile or it is difficult to say for sure that the seeds will be killed.

When I pluck seed heads off plants that I don't want to have sprout in the future, I use them in the bottom of my buckets as the bottom layer of cover material. That way I can be pretty certain they are well soaked with urine before they go into the hot top center of the pile where they will hopefully compost fully.

We have terrible sand spurs here that are very painful so I make a point of putting any I pluck into the bottoms of the buckets before they go inside for use.

Author: Bill Pellouchoud (Billp)
Wednesday, November 21, 2007 - 4:44 pm
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My problem in eastern Colorado is not gorse, but thistles. Thistle seeds are also notorious for being difficult to eradicate. If I compost these thistle weeds, will I destroy the seeds in the process; or will all the collected thistle seeds just sprout in my garden in a few years? Thanks.

Author: linda
Monday, January 23, 2006 - 11:13 am
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i know i read in the Handbook somewhere about being careful not to put seeds in the compost pile or you'll get stuff growing. I recently hung a bird feeder above some leaf mulch which i was planning on using. Some, seed from the bird feeder has fallen into this mulch. if i use the mulch as cover for my poop and then put into the compost bin, is this gonna create a problem???

linda

Author: admin
Thursday, January 26, 2006 - 1:06 am
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No.

Author: linda
Thursday, January 26, 2006 - 11:25 am
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thanks.

Author: John Zamick
Friday, April 14, 2006 - 1:14 am
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Hi guys

I have recently moved to New Zealand and I am about to start humanure composting (as soon as the new house we are building is finished).

A big problem is a plant called Gorse that was introduced from Britain about 100 years ago. I would like to compost gorse plants and want to know whether thermophilic composting will destroy its seeds - burning gorse makes it worse as it bursts the seed pods spreading the seeds but not killing them. In Chapter 3, it is stated that "Finally, composting destroys weed seeds. Researchers observed that after three days in compost at 55°C (131°F), all of the seeds of the eight weed species studied were dead." Is this going to be true for Gorse or are there seeds that are not easily destroyed by composting? TIA for any help.

John

Author: Anonymous
Friday, April 14, 2006 - 10:33 am
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Hi John.
If you find out will you please post?
We have a similar problem.
Thanks.

Author: admin
Friday, April 14, 2006 - 12:22 pm
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Problem seeds must be treated like any other material to be composted that has to be subjected to the thermophilic temperatures. You have to dig a small depression in the center of the pile and add the gorse there. If you use if only for cover and it collects around the edges of the pile, you will not kill the seeds.

Author: Larry
Saturday, April 15, 2006 - 11:07 am
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Gorse can be a difficult plant to control, no doubt about it. Here in coastal Washington it is one of the few weeds that property owners are required to eradicate. Lots of effort and money are spent, but it persists, thanks to the long life of seeds. One helpful strategy is to cut and burn or compost plants BEFORE the seeds mature, When the gorse is in bloom, get busy!

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