Using the finished compost...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Using the finished compost...
Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 5:27 pm
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Virginian, just a suggestion, to add bulk and help the compost/humus to go further: old newspapers, shredded office paper and cardboard boxes, somehow mixed in with the doggy pooh (and chicken pooh if you have any) could help.
You seem a very thoughtful and resourceful person, probably you have already considered this.
The bacteria and fungii which are present and break down the leaves, etc., will also break down the paper.

Author: The_virginian (The_virginian)
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 10:12 am
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My biggest problem is since we are only 2 people and 2 dogs, we can't make enough compost to meet all the needs in our garden and lawn. I have to get Milorganite (treated biosolids that are Class A) many yards of leaf mould, compost, hardwood mulch and pine straw to get everything up to snuff for the growing season. Last year I literally used my entire aged compost pile on one area of my lawn in the early fall that was literally trying to grow in pure red clay. This Spring I also applied leaf mould and Milorganite to that area and the rest of the lawn and it looks great with a deep green and a small layer of dark humus over the red clay. It is my hope that after a few years of adding organic matter it will stabilze and not struggle to survive. I generally have stopped bagging my grass unless I need it for the compost pile and the same goes for the leaves, they get chopped up in the mulching setting of the mower. When planting I use Milorganite, leaf mould and compost if I have it mixed in with the native soil---NEVER REMOVE IT--or it will act like a bathtub and the plant will become rootbound. For my fig trees I do my usual application of compost, Milorganite and mulch, but I will often rake back the mulch at the drip line of the tree and drop in some of my dog's poo and cover it up and water it in. The doggie poo is gone in less than a week and I have figs almost as big as small pears in the summer. My cold hardy and tropical bananas love anything I put on them and grow to 10-25 feet by the end of the season. My cold hardy palms put on some nice trunk and extra fronds that are a brilliant green when I plant or top dress them this way and the other plants in the garden go nuts like the elephant ears that can be as big as a compact car's hood.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 6:28 pm
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I use the compost mostly like potting soil and put it where I put the plants or seeds. That allows for a more targeted use. I also just dump it on the garden and roto-till it in sometimes, but I prefer to use it where the plants or seeds are because it stretches further.

Author: The_virginian (The_virginian)
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:02 pm
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I rake back the mulch and a little bit of the soil, apply the compost and or fertilizer and then rank back the mulch with a quick watering in....that's it.

Author: Wayne
Monday, April 17, 2006 - 7:58 am
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OK, once the compost is finished, how is it best used? Do you spread it out on the surface around the plants or do you use it like potting soil and actually set the plants out in it? I've been imagining myself digging post-holes and setting plants or trees out in the finished compost--will that work?

Wayne Ferguson
http://www.thefourprecepts.com/
http://www.thefourprecepts.com/waynesworld/humanure.html

Author: Herb
Saturday, April 22, 2006 - 12:52 pm
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I can't answer directly as I'm still waiting for my first bin to fill up, let alone be done "working."

But I do know this: when I dig bog peat and spread it around under trees on the surface, the trees respond positively to such surface applications. No need it seems to dig it in.

Author: James
Saturday, April 22, 2006 - 1:02 pm
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Nope, because the worms and weather dig it in for us. In nature, that is why topsoil is, well, on top! The trees drop leaves, the leaves mulch, break down, and become food for the little critters.

Cheers,
James

Author: Anonymous
Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 1:47 pm
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Digging it in might be benfical if you can do it without harmin the roots of the plants. So if using it around exisiting plants it is probably safest to apply to the surface or under the mulch. In a garden that you are preparing for planting, it probably makes sence to mix it in as there is nothing there to disturb and you are likely going to be digging and mixing anyway.

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