Fly control?

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Fly control?
Author: Muddy (Muddy)
Sunday, July 27, 2014 - 12:36 pm
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how concerned should you be about maggots in your compost pile? when you know them to be house flies? I've watched several macro organisms come and go in my compost pile during the eight years I've been humanure composting. I'm familiar with the black soldier fly. I've come to view them all as decomposers. It seems also that the actual composting hinders any life cycle trying to bet started

Author: Alan J Marshall (Ecointerest)
Friday, April 04, 2008 - 3:29 am
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Thank you Demeter, that is such useful, factual information.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 11:34 am
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If you perform a search on this forum, you will see that (house)flies are not really a major problem in humanure composting. If you use adequate cover, the flies are not attracted. However, if you are concerned about flies, by all means put a screen or net over your pile.

The main reason _Escherichia coli_ is often mentioned when discussing sewage treatment is that it is an indicator species. What it indicates is that there are live bacteria, most likely of human fecal orgin, still in the sewage or whatever environmental sample is being tested. It is a relatively easy bug to test for. Ordinary _E. coli_ is abundant in the human gut and that of other warm-blooded species. It is not pathogenic. Have you seen the primates at the zoo eat each other's poop?

Having said that, our modern technology has selected for some nasty mutations in E. coli, including enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC).

But E. coli, whether innocuous or pathogenic, is not flyborne. It is generally waterborne.

Granted, there are some serious diseases, including typhoid, that can be carried by flies.

Offhand, I would have a hard time choosing between contaminated drinking water and improper handwashing as public health enemy number 1. YMMV.

Author: Will DeVoursney (Will_d)
Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 4:07 pm
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Hi, I have been into public health and organic gardening for the last 30 years. I would not attempt to compost human manure unless it was in a fly proof cage. The edges of the compost pile are almost always cooler and some fly breeding will go on. The e-coli will obviously not end up being the dominant culture by the end of the process but they will be present in fresh feces. Does anyone else have this concern or have a solution for it? In public health the fly is public enemy #1.

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