Autumn Leaves

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Autumn Leaves
Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 2:31 am
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With Eucalyptus leaves, they grind down into small particles better if they are dried until brittle. In this condition the use of a heavy roller would be fine, but any method that works.
Maybe this would apply with any tree leaves.... try it.

Author: Utopian (Utopian)
Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 12:36 am
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The pH of the oak leaves is irrelevant. The only thing that matters is the pH of your finished compost. I would only test that and would then amend accordingly if needed.

I grind some of my leaves, but leave a large pile intact as cover material over the winter. I have had no problem with any failure in them breaking down despite not waiting for them to be converted to leaf mould.

Author: Shush (Shush)
Saturday, September 24, 2011 - 12:12 am
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Those large oak leaves especially flatten out under the weight and burden of the pile and cake under snow and encapsulated and long-lasting moisture well into the summer, thus making an impervious mass that must be chopped with a maddock, ad nauseum. The idea this year is to chop all leaves without fail; if it has rained, break them up with a motorized whip (trimmer) in the bed of a pickup if need be. One 1.5 foot high pile, 4X4 feet square so far collected from mulch bag of the lawn mower shows a temp of 120 F with humanure, of course.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Sunday, November 16, 2008 - 4:54 pm
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Why don't you get a pH test kit and find out? You can get a soil test kit from most any garden center, or you can get pH test paper from a science hobby store--the kind that sells chemistry sets.

Author: John D. Seibert (Shush)
Sunday, November 16, 2008 - 3:28 pm
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What's the PH of Red oak leaves? My 10' x 10' corral is 5 feet deep with half oak and half maple leaves, all Pennsylvania hardwoods. 12 months renders up beautiful deterioration. By Spring, these leaves are the basis of my humanure composting. What I don't know, is whether the compost is too acidic or not, because some veggies are not getting as big as they should. Thanks, Shush.

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