Cat poop

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Cat poop
Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Monday, July 26, 2010 - 3:52 pm
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If you are in USA, Canada or Europe, there is no problem. Just cook well your meat, and wash your hands.

"No significant associations were detected between infection and contact with cats, but consumption of raw or undercooked beef, lamb, or ‘other’ meat, tasting raw meat while cooking, working with animals, contact with soil, and travel outside Europe or the United States and Canada were significantly associated with toxoplasma infection."

"Between 30% and 63% of infections in the different centres could be attributed to meat consumption."

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=1564

Author: Nookyn (Nookyn)
Saturday, July 24, 2010 - 11:32 am
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If toxoplasmosis is a worry for cat owners, imagine what it's like for pregnant women whose neighbours let their cats run free! Can cats be tested or vaccinated against this disease, to prevent them being carriers?

Author: Megan (Megan)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 1:55 pm
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Why not just use the cat compost on your trees and shrubs and flowers, like Joe J. recommmends, and avoid the risk and worry? I feed my cats raw and healthy food, but I still don't use it in the garden. There's plenty of regular compost for that.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Monday, December 28, 2009 - 2:03 pm
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Past 20 years I always have cats (one or two), we have a larger vegetable garden and a box of sawdust inside house for cats (I empty box under fruit tree and cover with earth), also twice a year I gave them against internal parasites. They hunt and eat mice and field-vole a lot.

They poop everywhere and sometimes (rarely) they poop in garden. If cats are healthy I think there is no problem and I don't know or hear that someone would have this disease.

There is always a good chance (if you don't have cats) that the neighbor's cats will come to your garden and poop. In this case I rather see my cat to poop in garden, because if something is wrong with the cat I will know. And we don't have the disease.

Author: Alf (Alf)
Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 10:22 pm
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Demeter,
You might want to read a book called "Pottinger's Cats;
http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north70.html
This next is a review of the actual book which you can get from Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Pottengers-Cats-Francis-Marion-Pottenger/dp/0916764060/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1261969393&sr=8-1
"Pottenger's Cats is a classic in the science of nutrition. Dr. Pottenger discovered quite by accident that cats degenerated unless they were fed raw food. In his 10-year study of 900 cats, he found the optimal diet for his cats was 2/3 raw meat and 1/3 raw milk plus a little cod liver oil. If either the meat or the milk was cooked, the cats degenerated. And if both were cooked, the degeneration was much worse, and the cats could no longer reproduce by the third generation.
Some of the problems Pottinger found in the cats fed cooked food were: heart problems; nearsightedness and farsightedness; underactivity and inflammation of the thyroid; infections of the kidney, liver, testes, ovaries and bladder; arthritis and inflammation of the joints; inflammation of the nervous system with paralysis and meningitis. And in the third generation, some of the cats' bones became as soft as rubber. Lung problems, and bronchitis and pneumonia were also frequent. Moreover, the females became irritable and even dangerous, and the males became passive and lacked sex interest.

Do many of these conditions sound familiar? Pottenger, of course, realized that his cat studies didn't apply entirely to humans. He believed nonetheless that his findings for cats did have relevance for humans, and in his sanitarium he fed his patients much raw food, with considerable success. Weston A. Price reported in his book, "Nourishing Traditions" that all of the people's he studied worldwide included much raw food in their traditional diets and were almost entirely free of the degenerative diseases that are rampant in our junk food society, such as tooth decay, heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, digestive disturbances,etc.

If you want to stay healthy, you owe it to yourself to read both Pottenger and Price. Their eye opening photographs alone will make clear to you that you need optimum nutrition if you want to be optimally healthy.

"So as you can see from this study by Pottinger that was started accidentally, eating cooked foods and drinks is a bad idea for cats and according to Aajonus Vonderplanitz and a good many others, also it's not good for us also.
http://www.amazon.com/We-Want-Live-Aajonus-Vonderplanitz/dp/1889356778

In his book "We Want To Live" "The Primal Diet" he describes why and how to eat raw foods. It is quite surprising to read. I have started the diet out of curiosity and have had no problems.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 11:13 am
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This might be more than you want to know:

Toxoplasmosis is usually an asymptomatic disease, but it is serious in the unborn and AIDS or other immunosuppressed people. Hence, pregnant women who have not had the disease should glove and mask while emptying the litter box. Better yet, they should have someone else do it. A cat which has been kept indoors is unlikely to carry toxoplasmosis.

If you have cats "pooping everywhere," chances are you and your family have already had the disease. If you are really concerned, have a serology test.

Outdoor cats that eat mice and other animal prey are likely to be carriers of the disease. We can get the disease by ingesting (often inhaling) the cysts which are in the poop, or by eating infected raw meat.

The cysts can remain viable in cool, moist soil for 18 months, but thermophilic composting should destroy them in a few hours.

Note: Fresh cat poop is not infective! The cysts need a few days outside the host to become infective. So daily cleaning of the litter box is safer.

Source: Basic Clinical Parasitology, Brown and Neva, 1983, Appleton, Century, Croft.

Author: April Ford (April)
Monday, February 23, 2009 - 6:09 pm
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I am wondering if anyone has any experience with or information about composting cat poop. I am concerned about toxoplasmosis remaining in the finished compost. . .

Also, we have cats running around pooping everywhere. Is this a danger to our vegetable crops?
Thank you!

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