Biochar in compost bins?

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Biochar in compost bins?
Author: Rman (Rman)
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 11:55 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Saw a basic batch bio char prototype three summers ago that was used to test different types of sawdust and chips for volume, weight, heat extracted and other factors in the production of biochar from wood waste. Two summers ago I watched a continuous run biochar production machine made by the same mad scientist type. They were hoping for 4 tons of char but ended up with 3 by summers end. Unfortunately the prototype didn't get anymore tweaking, which it needed, since there ended up being an argument between the money and the science people. I do know that with larger amounts of biochar you have to be careful about heat sources, solar included, causing unwanted ignition.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Monday, April 09, 2012 - 4:23 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Dr Makoto Ogawa of the Osaka Institute of Technology in Japan states that: “Making
compost from litter and excretions has been common in Japan for a long time. In the
1980s, charcoal compost was made from fresh chicken dung and palm shell charcoal; the
more charcoal used, the faster the composting process. Under aerobic conditions the
Bacillus group became dominant and produced antibiotics that inhibited growth of soilborne
pathogens and suppressed root diseases.
Charcoal compost is now sold in Japan as
a biological fungicide. Various other organic composts are now being been produced from
livestock excretions and charcoal and sold commercially.” (Ogawa, 2009)

Source:
http://www.biochar-international.org/sites/default/files/IBI%20Biochar%20Application%20Guidelines_web.pdf
http://www.biochar-international.org/biochar/soils

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 7:48 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

As a side note. I fried a pound of bacon on my Toucan stove tonight using only a single can of Norfolk Pine needles and twigs. (thanks again Ken).
We added the bacon to our first harvest of spinach leaves grown in our own compost, enjoyed a wonderful salad and made biochar in the process.
This stuff is so much fun! :-)

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 7:38 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

You may be right. :-)
These days I only read the comics. (Arlo and Janis especially) the weather and the sports sections.
Both my wife and I like to do the crossword puzzles and the dog wouldn't know what to do with himself in the morning if he didn't get to fetch the paper so we probably will keep taking it.
I was just wondering how much energy went into the recycling process and whether or not turning it into char is a better way of dealing with it.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 7:19 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

In many instances I suspect making char out of newspaper is much more useful for the planet than actually reading what's written on the newspaper!

Much of the negative, depressing "news" we get fed with only drives our energies downwards. Making char and good wholesome compost lifts life to new holistic levels.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 10:57 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Sounds to me like you are doing your part to reduce greenhouse gases.

The production of charcoal sequesters carbon, which was taken by plants from the atmosphere. Composting plant materials also sequesters carbon.

Charcoal is a great odor absorber. I would imagine fresh biochar would be as effective as activated charcoal in absorbing odor.

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 10:13 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Well, I have been making biochar from just about anything dry that I can get my hands on. Including newspaper.
The newspaper is a little hard to get going, but once it's burning well, it works as well as anything else. Better maybe because it lasts about thirty minutes.
I have been using the paper char as a cover material as well as putting it in the urine bottle. It's seems to really help stop the odor and I suppose it's being inoculated with nitrogen and stuff at the same time.
Can anyone think of any problems with this?
Do you suppose it's more or less carbon friendly that just recycling it? I don't know what the process is that turns it into blank paper again and I have no idea if it takes more energy than just making new paper.
Any one have any thoughts?

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Monday, March 15, 2010 - 12:40 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Knothead plays with fire. :-)

http://picasaweb.google.com/knotheadWench/BiocharProducingEmergencyCookstove#5447860614401182834

Author: Ken (Ken)
Monday, March 08, 2010 - 12:06 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

All are welcome! Good composting and good burning.
Ken

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 9:38 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Yes, thanks Ken. I made my little toucan today and have been having fun with it all afternoon. :-)

I tried coconut husks. One coconut husk just about fills the can when I pack it in. It takes only about 10 minutes or so for the flames to die. (I never did see the flame turn blue).
I smothered it for a couple of minutes and then dumped it into a big stainless colander and sprinkled water on it to put it out.
I found that I could make charcoal just about as fast as I could husk the coconuts.

Then I tried the small branches and needles from a Christmas tree that I picked up. (for burning)
That worked really well and took more like a half an hour. No smoke to speak of and lots of heat.
I could have cooked dinner.

Then I tried shredded newspaper. Not a very good result from that. It started out ok but I don't think that it produced enough gas for the secondary combustion. I'll try newspaper mixed with something else next.

I ended up with about a half a 5 gal. bucket of what I hope is biochar. Now I have to figure out what to do with it.
From what I've been reading, adding it to the compost pile or maybe even directly to the toilet will only help matters.

What a fun and fascinating time I'm having tying all the different practices together in my quest to live a more balanced and nature friendly life.
It seems like one thing just naturally leads to another.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 3:48 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Thanks Ken for this useful information.

Each year, it remains me some wood from trimming trees that are not suitable for composting, which I will now be used as fuel for cooking tomato sauce in August, and at the same time I produce Biochar. One job, one fuel, two products, good mathematic :-)

(Message edited by Danilo on March 07, 2010)

Author: Ken (Ken)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 1:00 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Here is one I forgot to add that explains even more about biochar uses in the garden.

http://biochar.pbworks.com/

Phil Small is a soil scientist from Washington State.

Author: Ken (Ken)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 12:56 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Here are more links about stoves and uses for biochar in the soil/compost.

Check out the other links to the right of the page.
http://thinkingglobalactinglocal.com/biochar-workshop-may-9-2009.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXMUmby8PpU&feature=player_embedded

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 7:59 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Ken, thanks for posting that link. I think I'll try to make one.
I wonder if it's possible or even advisable to make biochar from newspaper. I would love to find a use for our newspaper that doesn't require shredding it.
I also wonder if biochar could be used as a cover material. I know that ashes aren't really very good but because of the carbon left in the biochar I'm thinking that it might work better.

Author: Showmemrs (Showmemrs)
Saturday, March 06, 2010 - 10:42 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

It might just be me, but I usually spill bits of sawdust around my throne, I would hate to have charcoal dust to deal with there... I add the charcoal dust and bits as I do the additions to the pile.
about the worms? they seem to love char, once I made a layer of char and old bread, chips, cereals etc. from cleaning out some cupboards. When I came back 2 weeks later there was a big ball of worms right in that layer.
All of my charcoal is made from deadfall branches or leaves. I save charcoal chunks from bonfires, too. Char from leaves is so easy to crush, wood not so much, lol, still do-able though and great for my Georgia clay. In 2 years it has changed my soil from dense brick-like texture to a deep dark soft tilth.

Author: Ken (Ken)
Saturday, March 06, 2010 - 7:56 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Here is a pdf that shows how to make a simple char making stove. Or you can google: 1G Toucan TLUD and it will come up.
I've been using this one since it came out on the web in January, works just fine. I have other stoves/retorts that I use as well.

http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/files/1G%20Toucan%20TLUD%20for%20Biochar%20Jan%202010%20-%20final_0.pdf

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 4:18 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I certainly didn't mean to disparage the intelligence of anyone. :-)
It was a Nat. Geo. program about the Lost Amazonian Civilizations and the soil that they created that first sparked my interest in composting and humanure.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Thursday, March 04, 2010 - 2:35 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I think ancient Amazonians were far more intelligent than we think.

About Charcoal
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcoal
and biochar
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochar

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 8:38 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Is this something you have to buy or is charcoal from a plain old wood fire just as good.

I doubt the Amazonians did much more than add the remains from their fires to their compost. Or am I missing something?

Author: Ken (Ken)
Wednesday, March 03, 2010 - 8:24 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I've been adding biochar to my compost for about three years now. I've not had any problems, in fact, the worms don't seem to mind it at all. I do this method rather than adding inoculats to fresh made char. By the time it arrives in the garden, it's all ready to do it's thing, quiet well in fact. We seem to be having good results from our beds.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Sunday, February 28, 2010 - 12:48 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Does anyone have experience with adding biochar to compost?

Interesting article:
"Now scientists are trying to recreate the recipe for the apparently human-made supersoil, which still covers up to 10 percent of the Amazon Basin. Key ingredients included of dirt, charcoal, pottery, human excrement and other waste."

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/11/081119-lost-cities-amazon.html

Author: Geordie41 (Geordie41)
Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - 5:52 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

charcoal is recalcitrant so would not be a carbon source, but it adsorbs moisture and other ions and molecules to retard their gassing off or leaching. would it have place in either the indoor bucket as a cover material, or outside in the pile? or would it be better to add it separately to the garden soil?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
http://www.discusware.com