COMPOSTING MEAT

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: COMPOSTING MEAT
Author: The_virginian (The_virginian)
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 1:32 pm
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I agree....I compost everything from fish/meat scraps, dead animals and even the fecalphobe's nightmare....dog poop....OH THE HUMANITY! All of this stuff breaks down in my pile with no smell and no problems and the compost it makes it awesome. My cold hardy bananas and palm trees love it and grow very well here in Virginia.

Author: Gfloyd (Gfloyd)
Friday, April 30, 2010 - 1:26 pm
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I follow the book's advice and throw all (spoiled) meats, diary products, fats, veggie oils with other kitchen "waste" in the raked back compost pile first, then dump the buckets on top of it all, recover with additional straw. Never smell a thing. Neighbors have not complained in almost 2 years of doing this. Thanks Joe for dispelling so many myths!

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 9:53 am
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"I converted friends to humanure composting not into composted humans. Wanted to make that clear."

That was funny, thanks for the chuckle. :-)

Author: Hoppyg777 (Hoppyg777)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 4:05 am
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I converted friends to humanure composting not into composted humans. Wanted to make that clear.

Author: Hoppyg777 (Hoppyg777)
Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 3:03 am
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Got a kick out of the last message and your response.(Ok,actually the very last message of this thread dated in 2009) I lived with a wonderfully basic humanure composting system for 7 years on the Big Island of Hawaii and converted a number of friends. Recently I have moved to Maui and am composting beef, pork, chicken and fish plus prepared foods, bakery and produce from a local grocery store interested in keeping the stuff out of the landfill. Graduated SRU in 87 and with a master's in 88. Would have enjoyed to meet you then to have sped up the process of discovering humanure. Thanks much for your book, insights and contribution to making the world a better place.

(Message edited by hoppyg777 on March 07, 2010)

Author: Ken (Ken)
Thursday, January 14, 2010 - 10:53 pm
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I use the bones and char them in a small two can retort in my wood burning stove, then grind them up and apply to my beds or back into the compost bin.

Author: Ladakh (Ladakh)
Thursday, January 14, 2010 - 5:05 am
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"If you collect meat wastes in buckets etc your neighbors will complain. That's one reason I said its a life style matter -- out in the country away from next-door neighbors. No meat byproducts should ever go in compost. It's foreign to the fermenting process."

And what happens in nature when dead animals are not eaten by other animals? Does God whisk them away to some sanitized cremation facility? Shesh! Just throw everything that might eventually compost into your pile, and if you find large bones or chunks of wood or fruit pits when you need to spread your compost on the garden, just throw them back in the pile for a second try.

Author: Nancybeetoo (Nancybeetoo)
Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 2:20 pm
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The prohibition on composting meat:

I have also heard and read this many times. I have wondered where this advice originally started. I wonder if it has to do with the fact that many people don't have the faintest idea how to manage a pile. Left to their own devices they would literally just throw all food waste on a big pile in the backyard, where the crows and starlings would indeed be very interested in any meat scraps as well as probably any high protein food.

Once at thanksgiving time I hung a turkey carcass in the air withe the idea of feeding the insect eating birds. The only birds that came were starlings.

With regards to the compost educators: I agree that many of them just parrot what they have been taught and don't explore and learn for themselves. I guess it's up to us to educate the educators.

Author: Shush (Shush)
Saturday, June 06, 2009 - 9:25 am
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Amen, right on, correct, excellent, Joe!

Author: Joe (Joe)
Thursday, June 04, 2009 - 6:01 pm
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FROM EMAIL:

The following is a correspondence from a friend regarding the humanure method.

"If you collect meat wastes in buckets etc your neighbors will complain. That's one reason I said its a life style matter -- out in the country away from next-door neighbors. No meat byproducts should ever go in compost. It's foreign to the fermenting process."

It is my understanding thus far from your book that human excrement, no matter what your diet, may be added to the compost. However, I did not see anything about adding undigested meats and fats.

Thank you for taking the time respond to my emails. I can only imagine the influx of communications you receive.

MY REPLY:

It is routine to compost animal mortalities (dead animals). Not only do we compost *all* meat products, we also compost animal mortalities in our backyard humanure compost pile. Your friend doesn't know his or her ass from a hole in the ground (to use a common expression). Unfortunately, this sort of misinformation is commonly perpetuated by compost "educators," who would be better off flipping hamburgers than teaching people how to make compost. I get tired of hearing it.

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