Biobag in compost heap or trash after...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Biobag in compost heap or trash afterwards?
Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Monday, September 08, 2014 - 4:28 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Hopping in here before Emasaly replies:

To get straw or hay that effective in shedding water, I suspect it would take a lot of effort "remaking" the thatch each time materials are added, and it's unlikely to shed much water anyway... theoretical on my part, not tried.

I have not gotten around to the project yet... will let you know when.

Author: Rman (Rman)
Monday, September 08, 2014 - 1:19 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

This is both for Emasally and Ecointerest, if the hay/straw cover material was deeper on the top of the compost in heavy rain season would it not act like a thatched roof and shed a lot of the rain. Would be cheaper and easier than building a part or whole roof if it got the job done.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Tuesday, August 05, 2014 - 5:36 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Emasally, it's good to see you getting so much interest and excitement into this down-to-earth technology!
Concerning the covering of the heap to keep rain off: I am having similar experience here after some very heavy winter rainfall during the past few weeks. Joe has suggested temporarily covering during heavy rain.
What I am proposing to do soon (NOT yet tried, therefore this is very experimental) is to put a "semi-" roof over it. Here in Australia we have "shade cloth." This is knitted, not woven, plastic sheeting to keep the sun off during hot weather. It can be 50%, 70% or 90% shading.
My theory is that if I build a roof over my compost heap, with a steep gabled form, and spread shade cloth over it instead of corrugated tin, then some of the heavy rain will be deflected off, while some is allowed through and will reach the surface of the heap as a fine mist.
I don't want to eliminate all the rain, because a little bit is beneficial. But if too much rain falls on the heap, the top layer of straw or hay gets water-logged and stops insulating the compost.
I hope this long-winded explanation is not too complicated for you to follow. When I get mine fixed I will let you know the outcome, but if you are quicker off the mark than me, please let us know how it works for you.

Author: Emasally (Emasally)
Tuesday, August 05, 2014 - 1:04 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

ecointerest..that might be true as there has been a lot of rain here in the northeast (western new york, near ithaca) cause i dont use much water to rinse my buckets since i have been using the bio-bags. i am thinking of building a removable roof over the active bin ? what do you think of that plan? i haven't seen anybody with a cover on their pile so I'm not sure about the effort. my bins are 4'x4' i use old molding hay for cover material in the bin and green hard and softwood sawdust from a local mill for my buckets. there is only one of me though...and my food scraps from a prolific garden. thanks for all your help everyone!

Author: Rman (Rman)
Monday, August 04, 2014 - 5:42 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Emasally, since you are so keen try something for me. Pull out your compost thermometer until you think the end of the probe is about where the active part of the pile is, wait a few minutes and then re-read the temp. Mine was 15 degrees F higher when I did this. You could post the results in a thread made for the topic, General Composting Issues, Thermometer depth. Thanks

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Monday, August 04, 2014 - 5:09 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I get the impression you might be using a bit too much water.

I use a small amount if water for two rinses, with NO detergent - just plain water. Then I clean inside of bucket with sawdust (rubber gloves). Discard into heap. This leaves the bucket clean and dry, aerobic, no build-up of bad smell.
Be sure the sawdust or other cover material is not going to scratch the bucket. Old compost or even shredded newspaper would be ok. NOT soil, it might be gritty.

Author: Emasally (Emasally)
Monday, August 04, 2014 - 2:45 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

thanks Rman! i figured i would start with the bags and see how it all worked and then go to just buckets. i dont really like using them. i have the bins all set up and have been dumping seasonally from a set up in a rental cabin, using a 30 gallon plastic garbage can set in an outhouse hole...it works okay and cleaning is no problem. i learned something from the video though...im going to hang my hose (which i have lots of water) right on the bin and stand over the bin. that looks pretty easy...i was taking the bucket to the hose in the yard, when i could have been taking the hose to the bucket at the bin. i just went out and checked and my bin is only at 95 degrees thats almost just how hot outside temp is! not good enough right?

Author: Rman (Rman)
Sunday, August 03, 2014 - 10:20 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Emasally, isn't conversion wonderful, it's like we are ex smokers. If I were to try the bags I think I would pull the bag off the outside of the bucket so that it is loose above the bucket and then dump the whole works into the new depression in the pile. Since I have never tried this I don't know if the bag will stay with the pail or not. If it stayed with the pail I would then pull it out and place it at the side of the new material. If it went I would leave it alone. Either way the compostables are at least part way out and you don't have to wait for the bag to break down. In practice I am too cheap to buy the bags and I don't find dumping and rinsing/washing to be a big deal. Today I did 5 pails with 4 litres of water total. I will probably use more on a normal basis but this is what I had on hand.Here is a link to a video that shows how easy it would be with pressurized water. I wish.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuKyhUVbKwM

Author: Emasally (Emasally)
Sunday, August 03, 2014 - 9:07 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

i just took the flush toilet out of my house YEAH! everyone thinks I'm crazy but i dont have to tell all of you how much i love it. there is a sweet sawdust smell in the bathroom now and i made a lovable loo out of an old bead board fir cabinet. looks really nice. my question is about the bio-bags...i am curious if my pile is not heating up very fast because the bags are still closed up in the pile and if i wait till they start to decompose it seems like i have lost the initial heat up after i dump. thanks for your help. should i break them? or not tie a knot in the top? or not worry?

Author: Test2 (Test2)
Thursday, August 19, 2010 - 1:38 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

I tried the biobags twice and think they are great - here is why:

1) Makes it very easy to clean buckets.

2) My bags did not break when I dumped them. So it helps prevent runoff, Even if they would have broke, runoff would be limited,

3) Without the biobag, bucket will smell until you can clean it. With biobag odor is greatly reduced.

Author: Utopian (Utopian)
Sunday, August 08, 2010 - 7:07 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I only use the biobags in the middle of the winter when it is so cold that I don't feel like spending much time washing the buckets. Used that way, they last me a long time. I've used them for a couple of years now and concur that they are almost completely broken down in the finished pile.

Author: Utopian (Utopian)
Sunday, August 08, 2010 - 5:00 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I only use the biobags in the middle of the winter when it is so cold that I don't feel like spending much time washing the buckets. Used that way, they last me a long time. I've used them for a couple of years now and concur that they are almost completely broken down in the finished pile.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 10:06 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

The biobags go right into the compost pile. You do not want to try to empty them. They will break open when you dump them into the pile. They composted about 90% in my backyard pile during an experimental year. I don't use them now, however, because I find it quite easy to simply rinse out the toilet receptacles and add the water to the bins.

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 9:03 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

They claim that the bags are 100 percent compostable so I imagine that they are meant to be added to the pile not emptied and thrown away.

It seems to me that that would be a rather unpleasant operation anyway.

Author: Tiva (Tiva)
Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - 1:29 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I noticed that the humanure website is now selling Biobags, so I assume they're good for lining the bucket.

Do those of you who use the biobags add them to the outside compost bin? Or do you put them into the regular trash after you've emptied the contents into the composter?

thanks.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
http://www.discusware.com