Anaerobic composting??

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Anaerobic composting??
Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Friday, August 01, 2014 - 5:52 am
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The closer to understanding the Humanure principles and adapting the Sun-Mar to those principles the better - but it will all depend on your own innovation to get things just right.
You may like to let us know how it goes.

Author: Rman (Rman)
Thursday, July 31, 2014 - 12:02 am
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I have an older unused sun-mar in good shape, I could experiment with it. To me one of the huge drawbacks of the sun-mar is the need for a black water drain. I suppose a volume of sawdust could take care of that.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Tuesday, May 01, 2012 - 4:53 pm
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It should be realised that a compost pile, even one built and layered well, will be a mixture of both aerobic and an-aerobic conditions. The variety of different organisms present will fend for themselves, pretty well. As the initial thermophilic conditions cool down, worms and other macro-organisms will gradually move into the lower layers, then into the upper layers. What we might perceive as anaerobic can contain quite sufficient oxygen for the worms, etc. They will survive well even in a plastic composting bin, provided you layer well.
When using one of the early Rota-Loos, back in the 1990s, the contents did dry out, forming a big dry lump which had to be broken up. Then, after I started adding sawdust, similar to the Humanure process, AND NOT separating out my urine, the resultant compost was much better, i.e., moist, friable and dark. So even a commercial compost toilet can be improved upon, just by following the Humanure principles.

Author: Utopian (Utopian)
Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 12:27 am
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Fer, if you really want to understand this form of composting, then get one started!!!
You can read all you want, but you won't really understand or appreciate it until you start dumping your own buckets into the center of your pile and find yourself checking the temperature of your pile 4 or 5 times a day!!!

Author: Test2 (Test2)
Sunday, September 25, 2011 - 1:09 am
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@fer

1) With air the pile gets hot and kills most every harmful organism. Without air the pile will not get hot enough to kill many harmful organisms. Yet both types are called "compost" in literature.

The former method is best for human manure compost.

2) An outdoor pile surounded by wire netting, wood boards... helps maintain a level top for the pile. That helps in 3 ways. First when it rains it will soak the pile evenly and not causes runoff or uneven moisture in the pile. Second, it lets you easily dig a small hole in the center of the pile to dump the waste. If there was mountain peak that would not be easy or even possible. Thirdly, it creates a uniform insulating layer around the pile. A mountain peak has more insulation around the base and less at the summit. Insulation helps maintain high temperatures.

3) A plastic container if large enough could work. You probably need to have holes in the sides to let air in. Also, bottom should have holes to allow entry of worms and bugs to finish the compost off. Wire netting or wood pallets are probably the best way to go.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Saturday, September 24, 2011 - 10:24 am
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The short answer is they don't really compost. They dry out the contents, which makes the volume less. Testing the contents of each type of process for beneficial soil organisms would make a great project.

Author: Fer (Fer)
Saturday, September 24, 2011 - 6:48 am
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Hello Joseph or whoever reads this.

I am a student of environmental studies at a UK university doing a final year project on composting toilets. I've just finished reading and making noes on the
Humanure Handbook (which is great) but have found something I find a bit contradictory. p144 of the 3rd edition states that most commercial composting toilets and
mouldering toilets are relatively anaerobic (yet still make compost). However p158 and other pages state that oxygen is necessary for composting which I
was already lead to believe to be true. If most comercial composting toilets are anaerobic how do they make compost?
Also, why is a bin recommended over a pile? Do you mean a plastic container that doesn't let air through the bottom or just a pile with a bit of frame around to stop it collapsing?

Thanks in advance for your answer. I would really like to understand properly.

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