Wheelie Bins in cool wet location (Se...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: General Composting Issues: Wheelie Bins in cool wet location (Seattle)
Author: Nokomis (Nokomis)
Monday, January 13, 2014 - 3:32 am
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Thanks. Milkwood's wheelies are working, but we don't have their hot sun. Joe's video showed a large on-ground pile already hot continuing hot under snow. For starting in a wheelie (2x2) in c. 45F shade -- a friend suggested stacking straw bales all around the container for insulation.

As for weight, a 45-gallon wheelie (200 litres) was okay. I filled it near full with dead leave (some damp, some wet) then poured in 10 gallons of water. I could roll it okay, over uneven ground.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 5:18 pm
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Thank you for that information from Milkwood. I am always happy to receive new ideas which can refute my understandings. If my suggestion that using a 200 litre bin is wrong, that is doubly useful information. I also like that idea of standing the bin in the hot sun... again proving my point about internal temperature to be not quite true.
Please let us know how you get on. Good luck.

Author: Nokomis (Nokomis)
Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 5:20 am
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(Message edited by NOKOMIS on January 12, 2014)

Author: Nokomis (Nokomis)
Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 5:16 am
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Thank you both very much. In my situation if I try Humanure composting at all, it will have to be wheelies (as they're using at Milkwood http://milkwood.net/2011/04/18/compost-toilet-specifics-the-bins/#more-2439).

I've read the Book several times, all the messages here, greatcycle's site, everything that Google (well, Bing) found for 'humanure'.

Now I'm going through the Milkwood url again, converting the metrics to US measurements and looking up Sydney's (Milkwood's) climate compared to Seattle's.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 4:52 pm
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Nokomis, a couple of thoughts I have regarding your project.
First, if you are thinking that by using Wheelie Bins you will be able to move them away when full, please think again! The smaller wheelie bins, say around 100liters (approx 25gal) capacity might just be ok for moving, but the 200liter ones are just too heavy to move when full. Either size is most unlikely to heat up, being too small to retain heat.
Secondly, you might be under the impression that artificial heating of the humanure is necessary. That would be a false assumption, as reading Joe's book will explain. The heating takes place within the compost, from bacterial activity.
Even in a "rainy, shady" location, provided the compost heap is built with sufficient mass, i.e., it builds up to 1 cubic meter plus, the inside of the heap will heat up to the thermophilic temperatures required.
Reading the Book again, carefully, gaining a full understanding of the process, is vital to success.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Friday, January 10, 2014 - 8:53 pm
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Have you seen this video: http://humanurehandbook.com/videos.html#festival2

You don't want to evaporate anything. Make sure the liquid is absorbed by a carbon based material, then compost it.

Author: Nokomis (Nokomis)
Wednesday, January 08, 2014 - 3:16 pm
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For my first Humanure project, I want to try the Wheelie Bins. The Milkwood site gives good details, but they seem to be in a warm dry area. In our rainy shady location, maybe I could warm up the bins with electric heating tape like on water pipes. Then wrap the whole bin in insulation if necessary.

Our no/low water toilet puts out about 75 gallons of sewage a month, which would need a lot of evaporation or it would fill up a 50-gal bin real quick. We can't deal with leachate, peeing separately, etc.

To further promote evaporation, I can line the bin with straw and run a vent pipe down to the bottom of the tank and force hot air down it if necessary. Will the evaporation smell bad?

We have plenty of room to store the full containers for slow composting by cooler bacteria. In our location I'd rather take extra care, at least for the first bin, than run into water problems.

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