As Sewers Fill, Waste Poisons Waterwa...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Global Warming and Other Environmental Threats: As Sewers Fill, Waste Poisons Waterways - NY Times 11/22/09
Author: Shush (Shush)
Tuesday, November 24, 2009 - 2:46 pm
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Re As Sewers Fill: The time has come for Joe's humanure et al. Consider this season's leaves for carbon additions to sewage - EVERYWHERE! Thought for day: Compost leftovers from your dinner out, America, so we don't waste!

Author: Joe (Joe)
Monday, November 23, 2009 - 5:11 pm
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As Sewers Fill, Waste Poisons Waterways

By CHARLES DUHIGG
Published: November 22, 2009

It was drizzling lightly in late October when the midnight shift started at the Owls Head Water Pollution Control Plant, where much of Brooklyn’s sewage is treated.

A worker maintaining a tank at a Brooklyn wastewater treatment plant. Half the rainstorms in New York overwhelm the system.

A few miles away, people were walking home without umbrellas from late dinners. But at Owls Head, a swimming pool’s worth of sewage and wastewater was soon rushing in every second. Warning horns began to blare. A little after 1 a.m., with a harder rain falling, Owls Head reached its capacity and workers started shutting the intake gates.

That caused a rising tide throughout Brooklyn’s sewers, and untreated feces and industrial waste started spilling from emergency relief valves into the Upper New York Bay and Gowanus Canal.

“It happens anytime you get a hard rainfall,” said Bob Connaughton, one the plant’s engineers. “Sometimes all it takes is 20 minutes of rain, and you’ve got overflows across Brooklyn.”

One goal of the Clean Water Act of 1972 was to upgrade the nation’s sewer systems, many of them built more than a century ago, to handle growing populations and increasing runoff of rainwater and waste. During the 1970s and 1980s, Congress distributed more than $60 billion to cities to make sure that what goes into toilets, industrial drains and street grates would not endanger human health.

But despite those upgrades, many sewer systems are still frequently overwhelmed, according to a New York Times analysis of environmental data. As a result, sewage is spilling into waterways.

More: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/23/us/23sewer.html

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