Human manure for biogas

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Global Warming and Other Environmental Threats: Human manure for biogas
Author: Annasmedia (Annasmedia)
Tuesday, December 20, 2011 - 5:03 am
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Thanks for your input. To make fertilizers is likely a very good idea, and as we have a huge problem with the effects from chemical fertilizers, it is important we find other options. I will add info about that on my site. I have already mention the importance of green manure, so it all fit in. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and ideas with me!

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Friday, December 16, 2011 - 4:49 am
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If you research the chemistry of biogas production, (you don't need to be a chemist or scientist to understand all of it, just the basics), you will find that the part of dung which bacteria can ultimately reduce to gas is the fibrous, grass like material. Even cow manure does not consist entirely of this plant-based component, so not every part of the cow manure gets converted.
As I understand it (no expert here) humanure, dog manure, anything from largely carnivorous/omnivorous animals, does not provide enough gas to make it worthwhile except in very large quantities of manure.
Think logically back to food bought in cans/bags for dogs and cats. I bet you pay an enormous amount of money each year for that food, right? So the most useful way of utilising the dog/cat pooh, or indeed humanure, is to compost it, add the compost to the soil and reduce the money you have to spend on costly fertilisers.
Small amounts of this compost have a huge benefit for the soil.

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 4:47 pm
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I'm not sure what your concerns are exactly.
I would certainly be aware of pathogens if I were handling humanure from sources other than my own family and would take care to avoid contamination. That would be true whether I were composting it or letting it ferment to produce gas.
However, if I were dealing with other people's poop, I would really rather bury it in a compost pile just as soon as possible and let the thermophilic activity of the composting process deal with the little nasties.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 1:18 pm
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Search biogas and related topics on this forum. Search button is at the bottom of the page.

Author: Annasmedia (Annasmedia)
Thursday, December 08, 2011 - 8:24 am
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Thanks for your reply Knothead!
I am looking into many different options, this is just one. And what you mention is another discussion :-) For the moment I am wondering about the pathogens.
Kindly Anna

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Tuesday, December 06, 2011 - 4:17 pm
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Anna, My first thought is; why is it necessary to use humanure for gas production when there is an abundance of bio mass available just waiting to be turned into gas and bio char?
In the last two years, I have processed all the bio mass that my small yard produces. I compost much of it. Such as the leaves and grass clippings and general ground litter. And I burn much of it to produce biochar, primarily the small branches and twigs, which is ultimately added to the compost. Either directly or by first mixing it with sawdust for use as cover material. The TLUD type stoves produce a gas that is perfect for cooking, though the gas is often used to fuel internal combustion engines as well. So one could run a generator or just about anything else just from bits of wood if they had a gasifier.

The humanure seems best suited for composting from my perspective.

Author: Annasmedia (Annasmedia)
Sunday, December 04, 2011 - 9:11 pm
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Hi,
I think human manure sounds like a great local resource to reuse. For the moment I am looking into the option of making biogas from human manure, but some people complain about the pathogens, the same with dog poo that is made into biogas in dog parks. Anyone who can have an input on this issue? Is the pathogen a problem, and/or how to solve it? I like to include viable ideas on my page www.best-alternative-fuel-sources.com/biogas.html
Cheers Anna

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