Coping with sewage disaster - ie. Hur...

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Handbook - A Guide to Composting Human Manure: Coping with sewage disaster - ie. Hurricane Katrina?
Author: Gayle Owen
Friday, September 02, 2005 - 8:15 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Is there any way that the principles here could be applied to the interim management of devastated areas like New Orleans?

I'm hoping Joe himself will address this - but any and all input would be valuable!

Author: admin
Saturday, September 03, 2005 - 11:14 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

A fellow has offered to make copies of Chapter 8 from the 2nd edition [https://www.weblife.org/humanure/chapter8_2.html] and distribute them in the Katrina affected areas. That may do some good.

Joe Jenkins

Author: Gayle Owen
Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 12:47 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

(smiles) That's doubtlessly the most direct-to-the bone chapter.

What about post-flood clean-up? Envisioning the herculean task of carting everything away (they're talking about bulldozing whole districts), I can't help wondering if composting might work here, at least in some areas.

A family - or group of families - *could* pile up all the muck in their neighborhood into 5' mounds, dig down a bit deeper to get some true earth, layer it on top... chainsaw/shred downed trees to tinker with the carbon ratio... pretty soon heat'd build way up and kill the pathogens that have no doubt been multiplying in the mildly warm flood-soup... the only real drawback (other than bureaucracy and squeamishness) might be oil and gasoline contaminants. (What *does* happen to those over time?)

Ok, not that you could get that much cooperation from most folks, but just as a theory... lay it on me... how naive is this?

Author: Heather
Thursday, September 29, 2005 - 1:39 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I've been thinkning the same thing! Wondering if folks in New Orleans could find enough dry ground to build piles on? Wondering how many buckets/weeks capacity you'd have to have while building/rebuilding a pile?
(Wondering what would happen if my happy little composty chamber were subjected to similar conditions? How would I save my buckets? Where would I get cover material if all were in chaos and my sawdust pile got swept away? OK- I am having post-apocolyptic neurotic planning episodes)

Could the sludge in New Orl be composted as a means to break down som of the toxins? I fervently hope that the folks down there get the help they need and info to help themselves.

Author: TCLynx
Saturday, December 31, 2005 - 11:18 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I expect that composting would be better than what is beeing done. Getting people to do it is the problem. There is probably enough cover material but it needs to be sawed up.

To get the government to step in and do it is probably too much to ask. That would be way too simple.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
https://www.discusware.com