Cooking for pathogen death

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Handbook - A Guide to Composting Human Manure: Cooking for pathogen death
Author: Joe (Joe)
Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 1:05 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

The dangers of composted humanure are way overblown. I have grown my garden with it for 30 years and never took any precautions other than to make the compost. I often work in the garden with bare hands (and bare feet) and often eat things straight off the plants (beans, tomatoes, peppers, etc.) and even off the ground sometimes without washing. Of course, if there is visible dirt on something, I will wipe or hose it off and of course I do scrub roots such as potatoes, beets and carrots. I don't like eating dirt any more than anyone else. But the idea that a garden fertilized with humanure COMPOST (not with humanure) is somehow unsanitary is just incorrect.

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 10:35 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

I do not hesitate to eat raw unwashed above-ground vegetables from my garden. Carrots, taters, etc, I'll wash. But I know my compost is just a "clean" as the soil I am adding it to.

Author: Danilo (Danilo)
Monday, December 28, 2009 - 1:26 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Solution is simple. Use it on bushes and trees and no cooking is needed.
Because the fruit is not touching the ground, so there is no contamination.
Also you can use it on ornamental garden.

Author: Test2 (Test2)
Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 12:27 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Thanks Demeter and Utopian for the info.

C. Botulinum Toxin is a non issue if food is boiled for 15 and maybe even 10 minutes. Their spores are present everywhere, even in house dust, but I am pretty sure eating the spores is not dangerous, unless an infant.

China used to and maybe still does apply raw manure of all kinds to their fields. However, they did not eat raw vegi's but stir fry, cook ....Those food procedures may have protected them from humanure pathogens.

If, you are not confident in your particular composted humanure, why not use the compost, but then cook your food well before eating it. But would cooking even be needed for Nuts and Fruit that do not come in contact with the ground ?

Author: Demeter (Demeter)
Friday, December 18, 2009 - 8:41 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Make that no _additional_ pathogens. Not boiling nor thermophilic composting will kill _Clostridium_. However, this spore-forming genus is in the soil anyway. So it is not unique to Humanure.

If you follow Joe' protocol, there is no need to worry about Humanure "pathogens."

Author: Utopian (Utopian)
Friday, December 18, 2009 - 6:46 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

A few minutes of boiling will not necessarily kill all pathogens. However, the entire point of humanure composting is the elimination of pathogens from the finished product. If it is done correctly, as clearly outlined in the book, then no special cooking is required, as there should be no pathogens in the food grown in the humanure amended soil.

Author: test2 (Test2)
Sunday, March 08, 2009 - 3:55 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

Would cooking food in say boiling water temperatures for a few minutes kill all pathogens found in humanure or urine ?

If so, use the composting approach explained the Humanure Handbook, and then to be extra cautious cook any food grown using humanure compost.

Staked Tomatoe plants/peppers/cucumbers grow fruit from flowers above soil , so it seems very unlikely worm pathogens could get into the fruit. Washing the fruit in say salt water would insure no worm pathogens on the skin. Is it possible for any other humanure pathogen to enter the fruit of staked plants ?

Similarly, consider staked squash plants. If the flesh is baked or cooked, it should be safe. However, could any pathogen enter the seeds ? If there is a concern with the seeds, roast them. But theoreticly could pathogens get into the seed via roots ?

The same question would apply nut trees.

I would appreciate any comments.

Compliments to J.C. Jenkins on his important Humanure book.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
https://www.discusware.com