Dog doo

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Handbook - A Guide to Composting Human Manure: Dog doo
Author: Pizza (Pizza)
Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 7:05 pm
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Thanks for the clarification Joe, and thanks Ecointerest and Knothead for sharing.

Author: Knothead (Knothead)
Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 4:49 pm
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I guess I've been living dangerously all my life. Even before I began composting humanure, I routinely raked up leaves that I know very well had dog and probably cat feces in them and threw them in my compost pile. I always figured that by the time the material turned into dirt it would be safe. Just been lucky I suppose.

Author: Joe (Joe)
Sunday, April 29, 2012 - 12:10 pm
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Yes, it is a contradiction. People who have enough pets that they can actually compost the manure from them often don't compost humanure. Therefore, they use a plastic bin (for example) that can be bought at Home Depot and put the doggy doo in there. It does not become thermophilic and I wouldn't recommend it for gardens. People who do actually compost humanure and do it conscientiously, can just throw any animal manure in it, including dog turds. The reason I suggested using a separate bin for dog manure is because I didn't want people reading the book to throw their dog turds into their backyard compost, which is what I would have been implying. Backyard compost and humanure compost are two different things. I would rather have people keeping the dog manure in a separate compost system. If they're doing humanure compost, then that's different. It's a bit complicated. I didn't want people reading the Humanure Handbook to think they could just throw their dog crap in their compost and then say they read it in the book. Yes, if their compost is thermophilic they can compost dog turds, even dead dogs.

Author: Ecointerest (Ecointerest)
Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 6:24 pm
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Pizza, I can fully understand your questioning.

I wrote some things about "pre-composting" dog pooh, some time back. That was when I was not using the thermophilic process of Humanure. In my experience with "cold" long-term composting and the use of compost worms, they did not seem to like fresh dog feces, that's when I pre-composted so the worms were then happy with it.
I agree that one can add pet manure directly to the Humanure pile for hot composting. Why wouldn't one?

Author: Pizza (Pizza)
Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 9:25 am
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First of all, thank you ever so much for writing this masterpiece.
I have a few questions, and I'll be asking here in separate threads if it's OK.

About dog doo. I was seriously shocked when, after spending most of the book reiterating that you shouldn't be a fecophobe and that pathogens get destroyed by the process etc etc, out of the blue comes this in the FAQ of chapter 8,

"
What about using dog doo in compost? Use a separate compost bin because many pets
are not healthy and pass visible parasites, such as tapeworms, in their stools. Use a cover
material, and let the compost age a year or two. Same for cats. Grow flowers with the compost.
"

I was speechless. Isn't there a glaring contradiction? Poo from people (who presumably have been sick at some point in the now almost 40-years Jenkins experience) is OK, poo from chickens and cattle is OK, but poo from dogs and cats must be confined, ultra-seasoned and not be used for growing food?!
I did read the book cover to cover, and I couldn't see one source that would support this, and in fact, on page 55, one can read (emphasis mine),

"
I get a bit perturbed when I see compost educators telling their students that there is a long list of things “not to be composted!” This prohibition is always presented in such an authoritative and serious manner that novice composters begin trembling in their boots at the thought of composting any of the banned materials. I can imagine naive composters armed with this misinformation carefully segregating their food scraps so that, God forbid, the wrong materials don’t end up in the compost pile. Those “banned” materials include meat, fish, milk, butter, cheese and other dairy products, bones, lard, mayonnaise, oils, peanut butter, salad dressing, sour cream, weeds with seeds, diseased plants, citrus peels, rhubarb leaves, crab grass, pet manures, and perhaps worst of all — human manure.
"

What gives? :-)
Thanks again

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