Using larger buckets?

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Composting Around the World: Using larger buckets?
Author: Michael
Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 7:34 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Hi,

I've had experience with the 5 gallon bucket and didn't like the frequent scrub out involved.

From a deli, I obtained (free) a 50 gallon heavy duty barrel that was used for olives and have been using that. It works great. It is quite stable and strong.

It's too large for the bathroom, so I use it in the basement. After 3 months or so, I screw on the lid and then rock it back and forth up the stairs--staying vertical with the barrel. Then, into the wheelbarrow and to the compost heap.

I use peat moss and that works quite well, but would like to find a more ecological alternative. I wonder if cellulose insulation would work-- or perhaps it is treated with enough boric acid that it would become toxic to plants after a while. Any ideas?

-M

Author: Larry Warnberg
Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 11:18 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

I want to confirm what Michael discovered: containers larger than a 5-gallon bucket can work. Less frequent emptying to a finishing pile is the main advantage. A standard 32-gallon pvc trash receptacle can be a serviceable container. Of course, a larger bucket requires steps or a platform to accomodate the higher elevation. Oversaturated anaerobic conditions quickly develop in a larger container, producing smelly methane gases. To maintain aerobic conditons necessary for composting it is a good idea to attach a drain hose to near the bottome of a large receptacle, draining to a sewer line, septic system, sub-surface drain outside, or a collection bucket to be used as compost tea. I use garden hose quick-release fittings with a plastic shut-off valve to prevent leakage when changing the drain line from one container the the next.

A large container can be heavy and difficult to move when loaded. A wheeled dolly is a great assist.

Regarding cellulose insulation, Michael is correct in his suspicion about boric acid being harmful to plants. It is a powerful biocide in small concentrations, and may inhibit composting micro-organisms as well as injure plants. An office shredder can provide a convenient source of absorbent carbonaceous material. It is not as effective as sawdust or peat moss for controlling odor, but works reasonably well. Get a heavy duty shredder with cross-cutting action. Cheaper units won't last.
Suggestively, Larry
warnberg@pacifier.com
www.solartoilet.com

Author: Anonymous
Thursday, May 22, 2003 - 2:33 pm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

[No profile available] Edit this post

If you live near any forest, you could go out in the woods, find some rotting, crumbling logs, and haul that stuff back to use in place of sawdust.

Author: TCLynx
Tuesday, January 03, 2006 - 10:05 am
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

View profile or send e-mail Edit this post

Heck, if you are near a forest, leaves and leaf mold I hear are great cover materials!!!!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out     Administration
Topics Profile Last Day Last Week Search Tree View Member List Log Out   Administration
Welcome to The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board
For assistance, read the instructions or contact us.
Powered by Discus Pro
https://www.discusware.com