Pet bi-products

The International Compost Sanitation Forum and Message Board: Humanure Composting Around the World: Pet bi-products
Author: Ghia Hoover
Friday, August 17, 2001 - 2:39 pm
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I am assuming that we can compost our pet's fecies as well as our own. That's just locigal sense. But -- What about the fur? My dogs leave more fur scattered around than poo. I have enough loose fur to make an entire new Great Pyr. Is this fur compostable or should I start learning to spin and knit? Another bi-product of dog ownership is old beef bones. Sometimes the boys grind these bones down to crumbs so they can eat the marrow, but other times I find whole bones around the yard. I look at these bones and think, "Yummy calcium" but they don't look like something that will decompose in only one-year. What do I do with the bones?

Author: Joe
Saturday, August 18, 2001 - 2:03 pm
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Throw the fur in the compost and throw the bones in the fire. The ashes then go on the soil.

Author: kash
Wednesday, August 22, 2001 - 10:07 am
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Actually, there are several people who will spin your dog's fur into yarn and knit you a sweater running mail order businesses on the Internet. Poke around on the dog related sites to find them.

If I'd known this when I got my dog, I'd have chosen one with a softer undercoat.

Author: Ghia
Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 10:07 am
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I chose my dog for love, not for a soft undercoat. :-) But since one of my dogs is a great Pyr, I have often though about knitting up a Pyr sweater. However, we live in Austin, TX and there isn't much call for sweaters of any kind around here!

But I would be interested in composting the fur, if there is any nutrient value in it?

Author: shelly
Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 8:52 pm
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I don't know about nutrient value but it would give the compost variety...as in the spice of life. alternatively you could leave some in trees for birds to use for making nests.

Author: josephine
Monday, December 03, 2001 - 6:16 pm
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According to the "1998 ed. Oregon Master Gardener Handbook" Hair is a very slow-release material. The NPK ratio is 12-26-0. I know nothing about composting human manure and this information was found in the fertilizer formulation section of the handbook.

Author: Curtis Folts
Sunday, January 13, 2002 - 4:09 am
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Since hair is a protein the nutrient question must be yes. If hair doesn't break down (feathers do, eventually) the least it would do is help break up clay-like soil and that can only be good for a garden. Try to break up larger masses of hair and spread it around. I have a black-Lab/Gr. Pyr mix and his "tribbles" go into the compost along with my cat's sheddings. I haven't started using their manure yet, gotta get a few answers re: germ and parasite temp. resistance first. I've thought about a small home made solar oven if greater temperature is needed to kill pathogens in pet manure. We'll see.

Author: Joe
Sunday, January 13, 2002 - 6:44 pm
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Here's a posting regarding pet manures I recently posted on the US Composting Council bulletin board:

Pet manures should be composted. In fact, all organic materials should be recycled. Lots of people ask me what to do with pet feces and I tell them to do the following: If they do not have a thermophilic composting system to throw their pet manures into, or if they're uncomfortable with the idea of adding their pet manures to their compost pile, then create a separate compost bin (perhaps one of those garbage-can size plastic ones) and add the pet manures with normal cover materials like grass clippings etc. Maybe add some water now and then. When full, start to fill another bin and leave the first to rest (maybe throw some earth worms in there at this point). When the second one is full, assuming it takes at least a year to fill a bin, use the contents of the first bin for horticultural purposes, like shrubs, fruit trees, etc. This makes a lot more sense than burying dog and cat shit in a landfill.

Author: TCLynx
Tuesday, January 03, 2006 - 6:02 pm
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Hair/fir human and pet does compost but somewhat slowly.

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